Episode: How autonomous flying taxis could change the way you travel | Rodin Lyasoff


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How autonomous flying taxis could change the way you travel | Rodin Lyasoff
Flight is about to get a lot more personal, says aviation entrepreneur Rodin Lyasoff. In this visionary talk, he imagines a new golden age of air travel in which small, autonomous air taxis allow us to bypass traffic jams and fundamentally transform how we get around our cities and towns. "In the past century, flight connected our planet," Lyasoff says. "In the next, it will reconnect our local communities."

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