Episode: 024: Thinking Outside the Food Pantry


Equitable Opportunity Radio – weekly conversations with visionary leaders who are building a more inclusive economy Logo
Subscribe
024: Thinking Outside the Food Pantry

Organization:Oregon Food Bank collects and distributes food through a network of four Oregon Food Bank branches and 17 independent regional food banks serving Oregon and Clark County, Washington.  Along with approximately 970 partner agencies, they help nearly one in five households fend off hunger. They work to address the root causes of hunger by offering nutrition education, strengthening local food systems, collaborating with community groups, and advocating for hunger relief at the local and federal level.

Topic:Taking a Look at Food Insecurity

Guest:Sharon Thornberry is the Community Food Systems Manager at the Oregon Food Bank. Sharon has been a grassroots organizer, trainer and advocate for community food systems, rural communities, and anti-hunger work in Oregon since 1986. She grew up on farms, was very active in 4-H and Girl Scouts, and was one of the first female members of Future Farmers of America. In 1979, she was a homeless mom with two small children. Sharon has served on the Oregon Hunger Task Force for 16 years, the board of the Community Food Security Coalition for six years (three as President), and the board of Bread for the World and Bread for the World Institute for six years. The sum of her experiences have come together to make her a passionate and knowledgeable community food security and anti-hunger advocate. She is the 2009 recipient of the Billi Odegard Public Health Genius Award from the Community Health Partnership of Oregon. She has worked for Oregon Food Bank for the past 16 years focusing on rural food systems and is the creator of “FEAST”, the nationally recognized community food systems organizing program. She has been a resident of Philomath, Oregon for 30 years. She is an avid gardener and loves to share the cooking traditions learned in the farm kitchens of her youth with friends and family.

Sharon Thornberry Twitterhttps://twitter.com/ofb_sharont

Take Away Quotes:

“The statistics say that rural hunger is not as bad as urban hunger, I think people in rural communities are less likely to admit they’re hungry too. There’s a lot of pride that goes with living in rural communities.”

“There aren’t equal opportunities for everybody and there’s a lot of deniers that say that all of this stuff is made up. But I’m here to tell you it’s not made up. We don’t think about the challenges of access. People with small children are the most financially insecure. Salaries have not kept up with the cost of living in this country.”

“We’re leaving a lot of kids in a really bad place because it’s impossible for their parents to have a living wage, especially in rural communities. There’s a whole systemic thing that we need to look at and figure out how we solve it as a country.”

“Just think: the food banks across this country, there are hundreds of feeding american food banks, there are thens of thousands of food pantries across this country, they all have volunteers. If those folks had taken even a fraction of the hours they’ve taken handing out food and been saying to the powers that be: to congress, to their state senators, to their state legislators, even to their county commissioners, “This is wrong, we have to do this differently,” what do you think the picture would be? I think we’d be in a different space?”

“It’s about keeping the discussion going, and people having success, and supporting small farmers. You can’t do enough to do that. Go out there and get to know your small farmer, find out what their issues are, and find out how you can help them stay in business.”

Resources:Oregon Food Bankhttp://www.oregonfoodbank.org

Presidio Graduate Schoolhttp://www.presidio.edu



Equitable Opportunity Radio – weekly conversations with visionary leaders who are building a more inclusive economy
Users who viewed this episode also viewed...

Equitable Opportunity Radio – weekly conversations with visionary leaders who are building a more inclusive economy > 026: What Would it Look Like if We Started Over?

Organization:When it comes to our current food system, Hampton Creek believes it is time to start over and ask what it is that you really want to eat. They believe eating right shouldn't be so hard; that good food should be good for your body, good for your budget, easy on the earth, and insanely delicious...

Equitable Opportunity Radio – weekly conversations with visionary leaders who are building a more inclusive economy > 025: Groceries as if People Mattered

Organization:People’s Community Market is a new business that is emerging from and building on the ten years of experience, track record and social relations of its sister organization, People’s Grocery, which is a non-profit that has operated numerous food projects (including the Mobile Market and the Grub Box), urban gardens and nutrition education programs...

Equitable Opportunity Radio – weekly conversations with visionary leaders who are building a more inclusive economy > 023: The People Behind the Food

Organization:Bom Dia Market is an inviting corner market offering local and international beer and wine, freshly prepared foods, and thoughtfully sourced grocery and household staples. Bom Dia Market is setting a new standard in the service industry. Bom Dia Market is committed to valuing work-life balance, providing a living wage at all levels of the company, offering competitive benefits (including vacation time), and immersing employees in the intersection of local food lovers and food makers...
Comments (0)

Login or Sign up to leave a comment.

Log in
Sign up

Be the first to comment.