Episode: The Cold War: What We Saw


The Cold War: What We Saw Logo
Subscribe
The Cold War: What We Saw

November 9, 2019, is the 30th anniversary of the day the Berlin Wall came crashing down, freeing East Germany from communism, and marking the beginning of the end of the Soviet Union. But when did the Cold War start? Why does it matter 30 years later? Find out in this ten-part series, transport back in time, feel what it was like to live through the end of the Cold War, and understand why that struggle was a battle for civilization itself. Bill Whittle narrates this compelling series about two competing ideologies battling for global supremacy in the ashes of World War 2.


Coming January 2020.



The Cold War: What We Saw
Users who viewed this episode also viewed...

The Cold War: What We Saw > We Choose to Go to the Moon | Part 1

Take a front seat ride in the Apollo Lunar Module as it makes its historic descent and avoids a near catastrophe unfolding behind the scenes. Then travel back to a time before the Space Race, to the America of cowboys and Indians, to understand how all of America’s small steps led us to the one giant leap...

The Cold War: What We Saw > The Thing Begins | Part 3

So now the board is set and the pieces are in place. In the East, the battle-hardened, seemingly endless divisions of the Red Army, backed by the ruthless and pitiless Joseph Stalin and his state-driven terror. In the West, the idealistic to the point of naïveté allies and their game-changing pika-dons, the nuclear flash-booms that had turned Stalin’s relentless ambition into a pillar of salt...

The Cold War: What We Saw > Magnificent Desolation | Part 4

Nearly every single human with access to a TV set watched the blurry, almost surreal image of Neil Armstrong stepping live onto the surface of the moon. But after Apollo 11 returned to earth, we got an entirely different view of those first historic moments. Join us for the journey of Apollo 11, the seven Apollo Missions that followed, and decades of disappointments and shortfalls, crowned at last with a new hope for our future in space...
Comments (0)

Login or Sign up to leave a comment.

Log in
Sign up

Be the first to comment.